Moving From NYC

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When I was an Urban Pioneer...

I remember my first New York City apartment. It was 1981 and the lower east side was a very different place. There was no Gap. there certainly was no Whole Foods. Those were the most glorious three hundred square feet with a kitchenette complete with a bathtub smack in the middle of it. Today we call them walk in closets. Back then they were called living rooms. All we ate came from the corner bodega and the only people selling anything organic disappeared when the police came near.

We all had a love hate relationship with the city that lives to this day. We loved knowing that we could get a pizza at three in the morning, although no one we knew ever did it. We loved that we could find anything on the street, even though ‘real’ New Yorkers never bought on the street).

We scoffed at the bridge and tunnel crowd that clamored into the city every weekend, never in a million years imagining that a few short years later, that would be us.

Those of us that are NY transplants fondly recall the way we lived, and for the life of us can’t imagine how we ever did it.

There are many reasons to consider not living in the city, while staying close enough to commute to work daily, or simply romp on occasion.

Whether it’s the insane apartment prices, ridiculous co-op boards, stratospheric maintenance, parking or lack thereof, trying to raise a family, having elbow room, having a yard, or for altogether different reasons, many people decide to move out!

Brooklyn is certainly attractive, but the value proposition is just not there. Any place you’d want to live will still cost you a kidney in the black market. You want a great community, you want great public schools, you want it all!

Welcome to the GARDEN STATE, or in this case, embrace your inner bridge and tunnel.


You can be this guy....  
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*No, he's not me. I grabbed him off Google


you can be this guy.

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* Not me, either. Who knew it was so hard to hit that damn ball.






Or....


Broadway stars would never live in New Jersey (actually a ton of of them do), sports stars would never live in New Jersey (actually, many do), captains of industry would never live in New Jersey (actually, you get the idea; yes, they do). Cool, normal people would never move to New Jersey (actually, yes, people like you, do every day of the week).

Some 28-60 minutes due west of Manhattan, there are some outrageously good places to live.

You want superb free schools? We got that. You want artistic communities? We got that. You want fantastic architecture and glorious hiking or biking trails? We got that, too. You want amazing places to eat? We got lots of that! You want places to play? Boy, do we got that! Don’t worry about the question, we have it!

Take a deep breath and explore our side of the pond (the Hudson, that is).

Being Close enough to play.

The US Census Bureau reports*: “New York City residents spend an average of about one full week a year getting to work — the longest commute time in the nation among large cities, according to a new ranking of American Community Survey data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. New York City residents take an average of 38.4 minutes to get to work each day…” If you commute to midtown from Millburn, the midtown direct train will get you there in 35 minutes. Compare that to longer time transferring subways while standing next to someone with questionable hygiene as opposed to reading or napping in your cushy train seat... You do the math. People that work on Wall Street certainly have done the math, and they happily commute from many of our towns.

We Can Help You Plan Your Move

We have helped people relocate from all over the country. We understand how difficult a transition like that can be. We’ll make sure you hit the ground running and have all the information and contacts you need to quickly integrate your family into your new community.

We are your resource, and more than likely, you’ll consider us your friend when your moving adventure is all over.

Feel free to
Contact Us with any questions.

*http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/001695.html